PanSuriya Art Post


Body Imaging at Pansuriya
20 July 2017, 18:13
Filed under: exhibit, performance | Tags: , , , , , ,

Abby Robinson lives in NYC and teaches at the School of Visual Arts (NYC) in both the BFA Photography & Video and Graphic Design & Advertising Departments. Once upon a time she worked for a detective and, slippery, mysterious stuff continues to inform her photographs.

Robinson, who likes to stare and to travel, has had many of her projects have been done with the help of grants from the Asian Cultural Council, the Fulbright Program, the American Institute of Sri Lankan Studies, the Siskind Foundation, the Art Production Fund, and New York Foundation of the Arts. There have been shows in the US and abroad and she’s been fortunate to have also had a number of terrific residencies: Yaddo, MacDowell, VCCA, Light Works, Altos de Chavon (Dominican Republic), Three Shadows (Beijing) and New Zero Art Space (Yangon). Her photos are in the collections of The Whitney Museum (NYC), the Museum of Fine Arts (Houston, TX), the Portland Art Museum (Portland, OR), and Light Works (Syracuse, NY).

Abby Robinson’s first body imaging project started in 2009 at a home-based installation in Manhattan, then travelled in 2010 to Shanghai, was seen again in 2012 in New York, turned up in 2013 in Las Vegas, came back in 2014 to Brooklyn and visited Budapest, Hungary in 2016. 2017 is for Yangon!

When:
• From 20th of July to 2nd of August
• Weekdays : 12 pm – 2 pm & 6:30pm – 9pm
• Weekends : 11 am – 2 pm & 4 pm – 8 pm

How:
• Have a seat in the waiting room
• Fill out a questionnaire
• Consult in the office about the body part you want to be photographed
• Step into the studio for a quick photo shoot

Diagnosis :
• Receive a free VIP Badge with your photograph

Pansuriya is at 102 Bogalay Zay Street, between the Secretariat and the river.

Abby



David Richards in Yangon
21 January 2017, 18:16
Filed under: exhibit | Tags: , , , ,

David Richards Solo Exhibition, 15-23 February 2017 at Pansodan Scene, corner of Maha Bandula and Pansodan, second floor. All are welcome to the opening on 15 February, from 18:00.

david-richards-3

David Richards 2016

David Richards has another watercolour exhibition coming up in February, featuring mainly paintings from the new direction he has been exploring in the past half year. He is including more abstraction in his recent paintings, though some are still colourful, some use a very restricted colour palette. Many of them still revolve around his favoured themes: the design of architecture, the beauty of women, the conviviality of cafe scenes, the landscapes of South-east Asia.

He likes to play the fluidity of watercolour off the rigidity of the lines and patterns of buildings, windows, leaves, or graphic elements he inserts. He is afraid that older buildings may be erased from Yangon, and would like to increase appreciation for them, by making portraits of them. When painting the buildings, he does not reproduce their current state, but enters into an imaginative collaboration with the architect and the city, painting them as he would like to see them, in their prime, whether somewhat battered or freshly painted, though not sterilised.

David Richards’ work is clean-lined and carefully composed. Only recently has been been trying to expand his boundaries into directions more experimental for him. This show will feature a mix of his established style and his new explorations.

Pansodan Scene is on the second floor; the entrance to the staircase is just opposite the gate to the temple. There is nothing on the ground floor, a bookshop on the first floor, and the gallery on the second floor. After the opening night, the exhibition will be open from 10:00 – 18:00.

David Richards was interviewed for this article 13 January 2017 by Lilly Seiler

david-richards-blind-tiger

 



Open History Project: exploring local memory through the lens
4 July 2016, 10:41
Filed under: exhibit | Tags: , ,

The Open History Project creates experiences of local history through the photographs, memories, stories, documents, and ephemera such as flyers, tickets, maps. Together we can look through the layers of unhidden history and discover connections, insights, new questions. In this way, people participate in their own history by revealing their part in society. Its first exhibition is 4 July 2016 16:00-19:00 at Pansodan Scene.

Pansodan Scene is at Pansodan Scene, ၁၁၄ ပန်းဆိုးတန်း ဒုတိယထပ် (ငါးဘာသာကျောင်းနှင်မျက်နှာချင်းဆိုင်) 144 Pansodan, second floor, across from the gate of the Ganesh Temple
Alaungpaya RGN

Our Kyauktada exhibition is the introduction to this Open History Project. It takes one small area in the heart of Yangon and traces the passage of time on its streets; from the events, architecture and commerce of daily life in its public spaces, to more personal reflections of changing hopes and dreams through fashions and family life.     

Experiencing history openly and without fear is an important way for people to understand the past, and provide an insight into the future.  

Myanmar’s people had little opportunity to dwell on their own history for many years. While stories have been handed down from generation to generation, propaganda clouded the picture of the past and public memory was forced into hiding.

Change can sometimes move so subtly that you can only see it from a great distance. At other times a flash of transformation can leave the landscape utterly altered overnight.

We hope to show these patterns developing through contemporary photographs and artifacts to give people a richer understanding of their own heritage.

Current and former residents and visitors to Kyauktada are the most important element in

this effort and we hope that your memories, photographs and documents can help us paint a vibrant picture of the history of this area.

This is the first of many such exhibitions that pay tribute to public memory and local history, and call on everyone to participate in the preservation efforts. We plan to organise a bigger exhibition on Kyauktada Watsonsat multiple galleries later in the year. 

 



One Myanmar launch at Pansodan Scene
8 June 2016, 14:29
Filed under: book launch, documentary | Tags: , , , ,

The launch of the One Myanmar: The Voices of Change documentary and One Myanmar : The Faces of the Burmese Transition / Les visages de la transition Birmanie book, by Carine Jaquet will take place at 19:00-21:00, 10 June 2016 at Pansodan Scene. All are welcome.

The book exploring the diversity of Myanmar at a moment of history change is in French and English, generously captioned, and features a variety of photographers. One Myanmar will be for sale at Pansodan Gallery from Saturday 11 June 2016.

 

 



Yangon, Old Days and New
26 November 2015, 12:28
Filed under: exhibit | Tags: , ,

A photography exhibition by Catherine Griss, at Pansodan Scene from Saturday 28 November 2015 to Sunday 6 December 2015.

Griss Old RailwayCatherine Griss is a sensitive street photographer who lives and works in Paris.

After photographing the ruins of french colonial power in Cambodia (devastated villas in Kampot, Kep )and Senegal, she decided to come to Burma and mainly Yangon because of its British colonial style heritage and because of this special time of emerging democracy in a world of increasing globalisation.

Birmanie02bis
After great travellers like Rudyard Kipling, Pierre Loti, Pablo Neruda, she first visited the country as a traveller in 1997. But she returned in 2011 and then again in 2012 with the intention of photographing and framing the transition. She is currently in her third photographic visit.

The theme of this exhibition is the old world’s presence in the beginning of a new world. There are three main chapters. The first is the Evolution of Yangon, the walls of old and new buildings, river banks and lifestyles.

the golden pagodas

the golden pagodas

In The Golden Pagodas (from the French Writer Pierre Loti novel), rather than the architecture, she focused on the people who visited the pagodas, taking time out to find peace in the golden halls of Shwedagon.

The Readers documents the Myanmar people’s love for reading, walking through downtown, she noticed many people catching up with news or getting lost in a book. This culture seems to be vanishing with the advent of mobile phones.



Yangon Echoes at Pansodan Scene

There Might Be a Good Story Behind This Building

An interview with Virginia Henderson and Tim Webster by Nance CunninghamWebster Yangon Echoes Virginia Henderson and Tim Webster’s book, Yangon Echoes, does not highlight the grandest, best preserved examples of Yangon’s heritage buildings. Nor the humblest, most fragile ones. Nor the mixed and smudged range from Strand Hotel to dangerous heap. While architectural heritage is the theme of their book, the people are its centre. That said, the photographs of the buildings as well as the people are fascinating as well. To make the book, they crept down hallways, peered around corners, knocked on the doors of strangers. Virginia: A few people thought we were developers at first. Some people didn’t want to talk, but most did, and even the ones who didn’t would usually invite us in for tea.

U Khin Sein in the second floor lounge with his protégé, Aung San. The former tailor has lived here six decades

U Khin Sein in the second floor lounge with his protégé, Aung San. The former tailor has lived here six decades. Photo by TJ Webster

We live downtown, and that was key. We cycle around, people see us in their streets. Some people were cautious about sharing their stories. We respect that. We visited everyone in the book multiple times, we got to know them all. Some of them we still see. It was about letting people have their say. Tim: Speaking to old people, because of the paucity of research, was invaluable. All that knowledge is in people’s heads. It’s subjective, but the information is there.

Yangon Echoes Shwe Gon Daing TJWebster Yangon_10914 copy

Image from Introduction to YANGON ECHOES: The construction of the flyover at Shwe Gon Daing, August 2013. Photo by TJ Webster

V: The older people who have the memories were really pleased when they realised what we were up to. People keep getting diverted by the buildings — they want to put a plaque on something — but the intangible is important. They were pleased to share their knowledge, they knew it was valuable for the people. T: Sometimes you get a really different view of history. Rather than hering again about Aung San being shot, we heard the story of a girl who was at school nearby, who heard the shots. We heard about her being taken by the hand and walking all the way home, through the grounds of the Shwe Dagon.

Yangon Echoes Ground Zero TJWebster Yangon_12804 copy

Ground Zero: Daw Shwe Yin keeps track of family memories in 50th Street. Photo by TJ Webster

Tim and Virginia will give a talk about the making of their book, including showing images that could not fit in the book, at 15:00 on Sunday 24 May 2015, at Pansodan Scene. Pansodan Scene, 144 Pansodan, second floor (at the corner of Maha Bandula and Pansodan, entrance to the staircase is opposite the entrance to the temple). All photos courtesy of Timothy J Webster



Join the next Let’s Speak Art on December 8 about the Art Market: with and without…

The next session of Pansodan Scene’s art talk series, Let’s Speak Art will be held on Monday 8 December, 2014 at Pansodan Scene, between 6.30 and 8 p.m. The topic for the third event will be The art market – with and without. We will see how the contemporary art market works, the advantages and the disadvantages if there are, and of course, see how the Myanmar art market connects to the international one. During the talk, there will also be a possibility to have access to the answers of the question ‘posted’ in the wishbox during the previous sessions. Just bring a pen to write yours down! Free entrance. Let’s Speak Art #3 | The art market – With and without Pansodan Scene 2 nd Floor, 144 Pansodan Street, Kyauktada, Yangon. The entrance to the staircase is in front of the temple’s entrance, almost on the corner of Pansodan and Mahabandoola streets.

LSA # 3 - The art market - With and without on Monday 8 December 2014

LSA # 3 – The art market – With and without on Monday 8 December 2014